Jukebox, Uncensored

You know the drill. Open up your jukebox of choice, point the shuffle feature to your entire library of songs and list, without exception, the first 10 or so songs that play. Each week, I add a little commentary about some of the artists, songs, albums, etc.

Reunion – Jimmie Dale Gilmore (Spinning Around the Sun) (1)
Why You Been Gone So Long – Micky Newbury (Heaven Help the Child) (2)
Don’t Break No Hearts – Steeplejack (Kitchen Radio) (3)
The Weight – The Staple Singers (Best of) (4)
Circle – Edie Brickell & New Bohemians (Shooting Rubberbands…) (5)
She’s Got a Future in Movies – Doug Stone (From the Heart) (6)
Love in Vain – The Rolling Stones (Let It Bleed) (7)
Virgo Clowns – Van Morrison (His Band & the Street Choir) (8)
Tonight the Bottle Let Me Down – Elvis Costello (Almost Blue) (9)
Going to New York – Jimmy Reed (The Very Best of) (10)

(1) A good song from one of the original Texas masters. Probably my favorite song on my least favorite of his records. Start with After Awhile or, if you want to hear real country music, Fair and Square.

(2) A straight country number off a 1973 record by one of the best, but most under-appreciated, songwriters ever. Micky was a friend of mine, but I can say without the slightest fear of bias that every one of his records from the 70s is a masterpiece. But for how messed up the music industry has become, Micky’s records would all be platnium.

(3) Steeplejack’s 1996 Kitchen Radio is one of my favorite alt. country records. It rocks when it needs to rock and it’s wistful when it needs to be. This is a mid-tempo number with a bite.

(4) They do a very fine, soulful cover of a great song written by Robbie Robertson and made popular by The Band.

(5) I thought Edie was going to be a superstar after I heard this record and saw the band live at Numbers in 1989. This is one of my favorite songs on the record. Their second record was not as good, so she married Paul Simon.

(6) Good straight ahead country song by one of the guys who briefly made country music country again back in the late 80s.

(7) The Stones have always done great blues songs, and this cover of the Robert Johnson song is one of them. A great album that suffered a little by following one of the greatest albums- Beggars Banquet. The albums the Stones did from 1968-72 are simply some of the greatest music ever made.

(8) I like Astral Weeks and Moondance Better, but this is still a fine album. Virgo Clowns is an acoustic, spiritual love song that would have fit well on Moondance or Tupelo Honey.

(9) A great Merle Haggard cover off of one of the best country records ever made. If you have any interest in good country music, you simply have to own this record.

(10) Jimmy Reed rocks. A classic blues number.

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Jukebox, Annotated

You know the drill. Open up your jukebox of choice, point the shuffle feature to your entire library of songs and list, without exception, the first 10 or so songs that play. Each week, I add a little commentary about some of the artists, songs, albums, etc.

I’ve Got a Feeling – Ollie and the Nightingales (Stax Set) (1)
Hey Driver – Dale Watson (I Hate These Songs) (2)
Doobie Wah – Peter Frampton (Comes Alive) (3)
Laurentian Divide – Bellwether (Turnstiles) (4)
It’s Only Me – Todd Thibaud (Little Mystery) (5)
My First, My Last… – Barry White (Can’t Get Enough) (6)
I’m Troubled – Gourds (Shinebox) (7)
Mission District – Pinetop Seven (Bring Home the Last Great Strike) (8)
What a Nice Surprise – The Vidalias (Stayin’ in the Doghouse) (9)
A Little Italy Rag – The Amazing Rhythm Aces (Too Stuffed to Jump) (10)

(1) I don’t know much about this Memphis soul act, but it’s a good song from a great box set. Motown gets all the run, but Stax had some great acts and put out some fine music.

(2) Fine song by a guy who remains true to his throwback honky tonk roots.

(3) There are two double LP live records that served as the soundtrack for my teenage years, The Allmans’ At Fillmore East and this one. Frampton sort of fell out of favor over the years, but this remains an excellent record. Not quite of par with Fillmore, which along with the Dead’s Europe ’72, is the best live record ever made, but it still sounds real good.

(4) A slow moving, harmonica led groove by one of the many great bands from Minneapolis. Alt. Country doesn’t get much better than this.

(5) Good song off a good record by former Courage Brothers frontman. Great playing, great songs. I really enjoy this record.

(6) Barry and Teddy Pendergrass defined sexy soul music in the 70s.

(7) Austin’s best kept secret play a quirky (to quote allmusic.com) brand of honky tonk music. This album also has the one of the most amazing covers ever, a honked up version of Snoop Dog’s Gin and Juice.

(8) This fine inde/alt. country band formed at Vanderbilt University (where I went to law school) in the early nineties. Very eclectic mix of genres, but it really works. If you’ve never heard these guys, check them out.

(9) After I heard a song on the internet somewhere, I bought both of this Atlanta alt. country band’s records. They are both very good. This is a neo-country number that sounds like a cross between Dwight Yoakam and Jimmy Dale Gilmore. Good stuff.

(10) I’m a big fan of the Aces. This is not one of my favorites, but I have and enjoy every one of their records. Start with Full House, Aces High if you can find it.

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Jukebox, Uncensored

You know the drill. Open up your jukebox of choice, point the shuffle feature to your entire library of songs and list, without exception, the first 10 or so songs that play. Each week, I add a little commentary about some of the artists, songs, albums, etc.

Sailor – Molly Hatchet (Beatin’ the Odds) (1)
Roy’s Bluz – Roy Buchanan (Live Stock) (2)
Handsome Molly – Bill Morrissey (A Collection of New Folk Artists) (3)
Soothe Me – Charles Brown (The Classic Earliest Recordings) (4)
All You Are Love – The Flatlanders (Now Again) (5)
Carry You Down – Son Volt (Wide Swing Tremolo) (6)
Where You Been – T-Model Ford (Pee-Wee get My Gun) (7)
Looking at the Rain – Gordon Lightfoot (Don Quixote) (8)
Cowboy – The Sugarcubes (Life’s too Good) (9)
Linger – Pinetops (Above Ground and Vertical) (10)

(1) The under-appreciated Jacksonville 3-guitar southern rock band’s third record, but the first without original vocalist Danny Joe Brown. A good song on a good record, but their first two records rock harder and better. I saw these guys in 1980 and they rocked the house.

(2) This is a great live record by a great, but often overlooked guitarist. This is the best song on the record and demonstrates why Roy was called “The Greatest Unknown Guitarist In The World.”

(3) It was this song on this compilation that turned me onto Bill Morrissey who for a number of years was my favorite songwriter. After hearing this song, I bought all three of his then-released records. This one is on Standing Eight, but both of his prior records, Bill Morrissey and North, are also excellent. The following one, Inside, is also excellent. His subsequent records don’t match up to the excellence of his first four. He hasn’t released a record since 2001, so I hope he’s due for another great one. I’ve seen him several times and he’s always good live.

(4) I really love blues piano, and Charles Brown along with Otis Spann and a few others hold a special place in my music collection. This song is a very old one and I tend to like his later stuff a little better. Still, it is a good song by a great piano player.

(5) Like everyone else, I have always loved their famous first album. This is a new one, released in 2002. This is a fairly straight forward love song by Jimmie Dale Gilmore, and not one of my favorites. But any band with Jimmie Dale Gilmore, Joe Ely, and Butch Hancock is worth hearing. If you’re looking to get into The Flatlanders, start with More a Legend than a Band, released in 1972 and rereleased in 1990 with some extra tracks.

(6) Granted, I like this record substantially less than their first two records, but it’s still pretty good. This is a mellow little number. Nothing spectacular, but worth a listen. Jay Farrar and some new bandmates have released a new record and, while I haven’t heard it yet, it’s getting some good reviews.

(7) Fine song off a fine record by a North Mississippi blues legend. Now that R.L. Burnside has joined Junior Kimbrough and Asie Payton in the juke joint in the sky, T-Model is one of the last of the Mississippi kings. This is hard, raw, bare blues. And it rocks.

(8) Nice cut off of a 1972 record by the Canadian who wrote what I consider to be one of the best and most musically and lyrically strong songs ever written: The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald. This is a pretty good song. A little mellow, but that’s not always a bad thing.

(9) I don’t like this song much. For a brief period in the late 80’s I was captivated by Bjork’s voice, but this is a crappy song on an album that, for me, has not aged well at all.

(10) Great song off of a wistful alt. country record. This is mellow done correctly. I highly recommend this song and this record. Good stuff.

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Jukebox, Uncensored

You know the drill. Open up your jukebox of choice, point the shuffle feature to your entire library of songs and list, without exception, the first 10 or so songs that play. Each week, I add a little commentary about some of the artists, songs, albums, etc.

Jealous Guy – John Lennon (Imagine) (1)
See Rock City – Kate Campbell (The Portable) (2)
Midnight Rider – Waylon Jennings (The Ramblin’ Man) (3)
Satisfaction – Otis Redding (Stax Box) (4)
Waiting for Sara – Cheri Knight (The Knitter) (5)
If You Were a Bluebird – Joe Ely (Joe Ely) (6)
Daylight – Dillon Fence (Rosemary) (7)
Greensboro Woman – Townes Van Zandt (8)
Margaritas – Ronnie Jeffrey & Kent Newsome (Demo) (9)
People’s Parties – Joni Mitchell (Court and Spark) (10)

(1) Good song on a good record. I like some, but not all, of his solo stuff. Of course I am a Beatles fan, but I don’t have the extreme reverence for him that a lot of folks do. I think a lot of his stuff post-Yoko was lame. Sorry.

(2) Kate is currently on my friend Brad’s Compadre Records label. Compadre provides an outlet for a lot of great artists, and Kate is one of them (along with Billy Joe Shaver and James McMurtry). I like this song, but I like the Kentucky Headhunters song by the same name better.

(3) Decent version of a good but overplayed song by one of the fathers of the outlaw country movement. Waylon has a lot better songs and nobody does this one like the Allmans. It’s a very good album that really started the outlaw country movement.

(4) Lots of covers and similar names this week. Otis sang everything good, but again, the Stones do it better. To hear Otis at his best, try In Person at the Whisky a Go Go.

(5) I liked about two thirds of the songs made by the Blood Oranges, Cheri’s previous band. I feel the same way about her solo work. The good songs are very, very good. Some of the rock numbers feel like toss-ins. This is one of the very, very good songs on a very good album, her first solo effort.

(6) Another excellent number off of Joe Ely’s first record, released in 1977. This one and a lot of the other songs on this record became Americana classics. This remains one of my favorite Joe Ely records.

(7) I missed Dillon Fence when they were active, but I learned about them via music-related posts at ACCBoards.Com. They were/are based in Winston-Salem, NC, where I went to college.

(8) Townes has always been one of my favorite songwriters. I was fortunate enough to meet him a couple of times and he was an interesting guy to say the least. One of the magical concert moments I’ve experienced was Townes, Guy Clark and Verlon Thompson sharing the stage at Fitzgeralds back in the early nineties. This was the first TVZ record I ever bought and it’s a good one.

(9) I usually violate the Jukebox rules by skipping over my songs when they pop up. I’ll let this one slide because I had forgotten about it altogether. It’s a song I wrote about the night one of my friends met his wife. Cool people, but not one of my better songs.

(10) One of my favorite records of all time. I’ve listened to this record hundreds of time and it never gets old. Unlike many Joni Mitchell records, there’s not a bad song on it. Some so called purists have argued that it’s too pop/rock, but whatever it is, it works for me.

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Jukebox, Uncensored

You know the drill. Open up your jukebox of choice, point the shuffle feature to your entire library of songs and list, without exception, the first 10 or so songs that play.

Starting this week, I am going to add a little commentary about some of the artist, songs, albums, etc.

With Every Wish – Bruce Springsteen (Human Touch) (1)
Walk in the Sunshine – Bob Weir (Ace) (2)
Three Days Straight – Ray Wylie Hubbard (Eternal & Lowdown) (3)
Blue – Lucinda Williams (Essence) (4)
Tonight’s the Night – Neil Young (Tonight’s the Night) (5)
We Won’t Dance – Vince Gill (When I Call Your Name) (6)
Angelita – The Backsliders (Southern Lines) (7)
Already Broken – Hadacol (All in Your Head) (8)
The Hurting Business – Chuch Prophet (The Hurting Business) (9)
Bad Night at the Whiskey – The Byrds (Box Set) (10)

(1) I more or less agree with the horde of reviewers that found this album lacking by Bruce’s standards. The album Lucky Town, released at the same time, is a better bet.

(2) Really a Grateful Dead record released as a solo record as part of the Dead’s Warner Brothers record deal. A fine record with some great songs, including the best studio version of Playing in the Band, Looks Like Rain and the song Cassidy is named after.

(3) Probably my favorite song on one of my favorite Ray Wylie records. I hung out with Ray Wylie many years ago between sets at a long gone in favor of more yuppie townhouses Houston bar. He is a good guy and impressed me as a deep thinker, even though we were totally liquored up by the beginning of the third set (during which I prevailed upon him to play his awesome version of Driving Wheel 3 times in a row). It is both pleasing and not surprising that he has become one of the main voices in the Americana philosophy-in-songwriting movement.

(4) Lucinda recently completed her Nanci Griffith cycle: immense love upon discovery; loyalty through questionable changes in musical direction; frustration; abandonment. I loved her first 4 records. Car Wheels was a much anticipated disappointment. I didn’t like Essence at all. World Without Tears was better, giving me hope that she can avoid a Nanci-like fall into the abyss of artsy-fartsy self-importance.

(5) An almost perfect record by one of the greatest songwriters of our time. If I ever do a Top 25 Albums list, this one would be near the top.

(6) I’m sort of over him now, but Vince and Travis Tritt led the much needed country music resurgence of the late 1980s.

(7) Throwin’ Rocks at the Moon was better, and the live EP From Raleigh, NC (which contains Lexington Avenue, one of my favorite songs) is best. But this is a good record by the last standing member of a NC band that was once compared to Gram Parsons.

(8) Hadacol plays a good, hard-edged version of alternative country. The band is a regular on Rancho Radio.

(9) I was somewhat of a fan of Green on Red, sometimes credited as a forefather of the No Depression movement that spawned Uncle Tupelo and most of my other favorite bands. His solo work is much more mellow and introspective, but it works. This record is perhaps the least accessible of his solo records (start with Homemade Blood), but it’s still a good listen.

(10) Every band I like, every band I ever played in and every song I write is influenced in some way by The Byrds (I Know Better Now, being one example where I strived for their sound). Roger McGuinn has a blog.

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Jukebox, Uncensored

You know the drill. Open up your jukebox of choice, point the shuffle feature to your entire library of songs and list, without exception, the first 10 or so songs that play.

Storybook Endings – BR5-49 (Big Backyard Beat Show)
Canray’s Contredanse – Beausoleil (Hot Chili Mama)
The Rose of San Joaquin – Tom Russell (The Rose of San Joaquin)
Your Sweet Lovin’ – Margie Joseph (Stax Set)
My Hometown – Bruce Springsteen (Live 1975-85)
When I’m at Your House – Loudon Wainwright III (History)
Ain’t We Funky Now – Brothers Johnson (Blam!!)
Don’t Let Me Down Again – Rusty Weir (Stacked Deck)
Vulcan Death Grip – Ugly Americans (Stereophonic Spanish Fly)
Beggar’s Will – Steve Pride (Haint)

Jukebox, Uncensored

You know the drill. Open up your jukebox of choice, point the shuffle feature to your entire library of songs and list, without exception, the first 10 or so songs that play.

Hot Rod Heart – John Fogerty (Blue Moon Swamp)
Floating – Blue Rodeo (Outskirts)
Like a Mole in the Ground – 5 Chinese Bros. (Stone Soup)
Spoonful – Cream (Fresh Cream)
Bluebird – Howlin’ Wolf (The Chess Box)
Tall Trees in GA – Buffy Sainte-Marie (Im Gonna be a County Girl Again)
Grapefruit Juicy Fruit – Jimmy Buffett (A White Sport Coat…)
Couch – 15 Mary Thompsons (MP3.Com)
Coloured Rain – Traffic (Mr. Fantasy)
Ship of Fools – Grateful Dead (From the Mars Hotel)